p's Miata

Discussion in 'Members Rides' started by pitty, Oct 23, 2014.

  1. pitty

    pitty likes the tuna here

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    Yeah, I don't mind it. It cleared every speed bump I could find on the way to the car wash, which is a bonus.

    The other one is the Garage Vary lip, and it's great for scraping gum and roadkill off the pavement with the slammed to the bumpstops cars that it's often attached to.
     
  2. tperkins

    tperkins Devout AYC Disciple

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    When do you install the 12" wide Rotas and 215's?
     
  3. pitty

    pitty likes the tuna here

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    Oh hi there guise!
    [​IMG]

    Who's this? Did the Miata turn blue? No. Back in May, a friend asked me to quickly fix his car, and it turned into a two month project of fixing, modding, converting to a standalone, and tuning, which culminated in a healthy 137whp supercharged blueberry above. Coincidentally, my car spent the time in a cottage country garage getting very lonely. But now she's back and ready to party.

    Car stereo interlude. A long time ago, I obtained a Retrosound radio for a minimalist receiver. What does it do? It does double USB, double auxiliary, bluetooth, and FM/AM radio. What doesn't it do? It doesn't look like 2001 is still here.

    Here it is, compared to the factory radio:
    [​IMG]

    Since this unit is designed for cars from before the Cold War hit its peak, it doesn't really do "DIN". Fitting it into your car takes a bit of creativity and a dremel:
    [​IMG]

    I bolted it up to the stereo cage and that was pretty much it. For over a year, this was my center console:
    [​IMG]

    Gross. Time to do some CAD.
    [​IMG]

    Then some TinkerCAD.
    [​IMG]

    Then tell the shitty printer to make it.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    (Took its sweet time for three hours)

    Then fit the bits in.
    [​IMG]

    Then fit the whole thing in place.
    [​IMG]

    Fits nice. The LED is a WBO controller diagnostic light, and the display is for the homemade multigauge project:
    [​IMG]

    This was more or less a fitment and dimensions test, and it worked. Next one will include a bunch of changes. Not sure if it needs paint, I kind of like the rough FDM look.

    When do I install the 12" wide Rotas and 215s pull the motor and install turbo? Soon.

    P.S. How is Retrosound? It's great. <3 it.
     
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  4. Xanicron

    Xanicron I'm trying

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    Sew Fauncy.

    Curious to see more about how your multigauge works. Does it get data from the Megasquirt? Is there a lot involved to program the variable display?
     
  5. pitty

    pitty likes the tuna here

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    Yeah, MSPNP has an eclectic implementation of a CAN broadcast that the Arduino gizmo reads bit by bit via a CAN controller/transceiver, then decodes into data. It's not rocket science if you have some background in computer science.

    It's not really "variable", I just want to dump the AFR, MAP, CLT and MAT where I can see it without installing a bunch of gauges.
     
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  6. pitty

    pitty likes the tuna here

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    Time to pull out... the engine.

    Hoods? Who needs them.
    [​IMG]

    Off with the bumper.
    [​IMG]

    Out with the engine undertray displaying the signs of a leaky front seal.
    [​IMG]

    At this point, the car is like
    [​IMG]

    All the engine wiring disconnected, and out goes intake and radiator. Fluids drained and drank. This engine isn't exactly taking much space here.
    [​IMG]

    Compared to taking apart the 3, this is downright pleasant. Not much extra (the intake bits are never going back in), and I'm sorting hardware into marked ziplock snack bags.
    [​IMG]

    Next time I unbolt the driveshaft, remove the shifter assembly, disconnect the powerplant brace from the transmission, and yank the engine and gearbox as a whole. Then I cry, because the weather is still great, but the car is all in bits again and it will be weeks before all the parts arrive.

    Stay tuna.
     
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  7. tperkins

    tperkins Devout AYC Disciple

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    Excellent.

    You know, there looks to be enough room for a 4g63 in there.
     
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  8. pitty

    pitty likes the tuna here

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    Got a notice from my favourite purveyor of Miata crack that my coolant reroute kit is on the way along with some other crucial bits. This might take less time than expected.

    Only stopped by the garage to poke the 3 with a touch up paint pen today, but couldn't stay away from the wrenches.

    The powerplant frame! It's a giant metal brace which connects a Miata transmission to the differential carrier thus creating a kind of a torque tube-like structure. Can be observed during my differential swap:
    [​IMG]

    The bolts mating this brace to the differential carrier were really hard to undo, with oodles of torque in the impact and pry bar leverage to pull the bolts out. The bolts on the transmission side worried me, because I have no monstrous impact, or space for any work involving leverage. So there they were,
    [​IMG]
    Nice greasy transmission. Rear seal also leaking!

    But hey, they came out with minimal effort. So easy it's almost disappointing, I was gearing up for battle here...
    [​IMG]

    ... probably because the alloy transmission case doesn't rust like the differential carrier did. Bolts are nice and clean.
    [​IMG]

    Also pulled off the power steering pump and sprayed everything with Gunk, as instructed by Freiburger and Finnegan.
    [​IMG]

    Next I was going to undo the driveshaft, but it dawned on me that I'm going to need a little helper to do that. That will have to wait until Thursday or whenever I can kidnap someone and make them help me. Good thing school is back in session.
     
  9. tperkins

    tperkins Devout AYC Disciple

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    Famous last words.
     
  10. Greg

    Greg Local Grumpy Moderator

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    [​IMG]
     
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  11. pitty

    pitty likes the tuna here

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    Discount tool reviews! I obtained a $199 engine hoist from princess auto in hopes that in the long run it'll be cheaper than renting a hoist for a fifty whenever it's needed. The assembled implement claims to be good for up to 1,000kg at the shortest beam setting, and looks to be made fairly well, however...
    [​IMG]
    This is it at maximum extension, pushed all the way to the radiator support of the car (I had to remove all the structural bumper bits to get it even that deep). Conclusion, if you're trying to use this to yank a motor out of a Camaro, you're shit out of luck because it'll maybe reach to your radiator. I feel like it should be fine for most transverse front wheel drive engines, but probably not for what I want to dig into next.

    I proceeded to drill an extra set of holes in the hook beam, which gave me another 20 cm of extension and theoretically decreased the capacity of the hoist to 200kg. Partial success was achieved.
    [​IMG]

    We're yanking this guy with the transmission, just because. Gearbox is fairly compact, weighs nothing, and will simplify clutch installation. I estimate the weight of the bundle to be about 300lbs, which is substantially less than 200kg, however the hydraulic cylinder would intermittently lose pressure and the beam would hastily lower. Not optimal, especially when you want to align the motor with your engine stand. After picking up a bunch of M10x1.50 bolts for stand mounting, I learned that the block is threaded for M10x1.25, and that's how you spend half a day going to hardware stores and back, buying bolts. Eventually darkness fell, and I had this ready for further carnage.

    [​IMG]
    Nobody likes early sunsets. Or seasons. >:(

    While waiting for a spark of inspiration, I ordered a new timing belt, tensioners, water pump, front and rear crank seals, crank woodruff key, and cam oil seals. Thank you Rockauto, no thanks to the new parts counter hire at a local Mazda shop who tried to tell me that my car is too old and there are no parts for it, and I'd be surprised what parts are discontinued, and blah blah blah. In the end he ended up ordering every one of the discontinued and unavailable parts and they should arrive in four days. :\

    New day!
    Greasy transmission. I'm a little bit concerned that the case leaks, but the oil which came out of it didn't seem to be missing volume compared to what came in. Time will tell, but if it's busted, it's a good excuse to get a later gearbox.[​IMG]

    Rear main, pooled oil at the bottom of the case. This thing definitely leaks, a quarter cup of oil dripped out when I split the bellhousing from the engine.
    [​IMG]

    Valve cover off, and there's some oil under the gasket. Not sure if it sneaked in there while I was unbolting the cover, because the gasket is new, and the spark wells are fairly dry.
    [​IMG]

    Spark plugs. 1, 2, 3 are great, but 4 looks rich. This is a little bit confusing and warrants further investigation.
    [​IMG]

    Puddle of oil under the timing cover and all over the place from the busted front seal.
    [​IMG]

    While I'm waiting for my parts, I need to fashion a tool to hold the timing gear in place while unbolting the crank.

    If anyone has any heavy duty degreasing advice, learn me it. I want this thing to shine, but scraping all this gunk with a toothbrush seems a bit of a herculean task.
     
  12. pitty

    pitty likes the tuna here

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    Ghetto tools!

    Needed one to hold the timing gear while the crank bolt is loosened. These are sold for about $26 (plus shipping), but are made for about seven bucks.

    1) Mark the bolt pattern on a 3/16 steel plate in whiteout, and drill/grind out the marked areas. Thank you Mazda for spacing the pulley with convenient stencil-like shims.
    [​IMG]

    2) Attach the result to the crank gear and pray that 3/16 is thick enough to endure the torque...
    [​IMG]

    3) Prayers, answered. Out goes the crank bolt.
    [​IMG]

    The dreaded keyway is mint. Guess I don't need a new crank... yet.
    [​IMG]

    On a sidenote, I really appreciate this non-interference engine thing where you can spin the crank all day long without slamming the pistons into static valves.
     
  13. Murrdawg02

    Murrdawg02 Danger to the manifold

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    Nice work. I picked up one of the Princess Auto hoists last fall to pull my engine to replace the clutch. I looked online for a while, and it appeared all cheap (including the PA brand) hoists were identical, just painted different colours. I agree the arm could be longer, but I was able to pull the TD42 engine without having to take the grill off. I didnt have any problems with the hydraulic lift, so maybe yours is defective. All n' all for the price you really cant beat it.

    Re cleaning
    I cleaned mine using an engine degreaser, letting it soak, then using a water sprayer like this filled with hot water and dish soap. Mine is slightly different but same idea. It definitely cleaned it, after multiple passes. If I were to do it again, I would buy a small steamer like this, combined with degreaser.
     
  14. pitty

    pitty likes the tuna here

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    Do you have the 1-ton?

    I started scrubbing it with dish soap and a plastic brush, and it worked fairly well albeit high effort. Engine degreaser didn't do much because the oil leaks aren't fresh and there are years of caked up dirt which doesn't dislodge without heavy scraping. Just ordered that tiny steamer too, lots of things to use that on. Thanks for the hint!
     
  15. Murrdawg02

    Murrdawg02 Danger to the manifold

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    Oh I think I have the 2 ton. My engine is a bit of a beast so I couldnt fully extend it. But I can see how the 1 ton would probably not be ideal.

    Yea I wasnt overwhelmed with the degreaser because as you said, I think it works better on less caked on applications, but it slowly got through it. Yea Im thinking about ordering one of those steamers, I am not sure how much pressure it will push out-but like you said there is alot of things to use it on!
     
  16. pitty

    pitty likes the tuna here

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    Heh, yeah. I asked because the 1 ton is much smaller than the 2 ton. The pivot wouldn't reach far over your truck's hood line. :) I went with it because space is an issue in my cave, but had an Oh Shit moment once I assembled it. It sort of worked, and would work again if I don't buy any adult sized cars.
     
  17. IanB

    IanB New Member

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    Definitely interested in your thoughts on the steamer when it shows up, if it works I'd grab one for myself.

    Nice progress on the project!
     
  18. pitty

    pitty likes the tuna here

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    It's actually surprisingly effective! Holds 250ml of water, heats up in about five minutes, and generates more steam than you'd expect from its side. Size is the biggest caveat, the effective area of the spray is maybe 3-4mm in diameter, so it would take a while to steam off big items. Within that diameter however, it blasts gunk away very well. I tested it on this extremely filthy coolant housing pipe thing, and it took maybe five minutes and one refill which I probably didn't need.
    Before:
    [​IMG]

    After:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Anyway! Today I stopped by the garage to pick up winter floor mats for the van, ended up staying to do crank oil seals. Also forgot to pick up the winter floor mats in the end.

    The front was extremely tenacious. Standard procedure is to drill a tiny hole through the metal backing of the seal, screw in a self-tapping screw, and pull the seal out. Which I've tried three times, and each time it did not budge. Eventually pried it out, and it looked wrecked like Linsday Lohan on a saturday morning:
    [​IMG]

    Damaged the oil pump lip a bit, but the sealing surface is untouched.
    [​IMG]

    3d printed ghetto tool to press in the replacement evenly:
    [​IMG]

    This was the first crank seal I've ever pulled (like just about everything I do in this project, lots of cherries popped), and every how-to video I've seen had them simply pop out with a tug. I was ready to throw in the towel and go buy a new oil pump, or a new engine, or something, then at the point where I had nothing to lose the stupid seal finally came out. If I had to do it again, I'd have drilled all around the backing of the seal until it loosened sufficiently, although getting stuck solid is definitely not its normal mode of operation.

    Rear came out eagerly, although I unbolted the seal retaining bracket out of concern that the RTV-like stuff it was sealed with from factory deteriorated. Which was true, and just removing the seal would have still left me with oil leaks around the retainer. Reapplied black RTV, reinstalled the bracket, and tapped in the seal evenly millimeter by millimeter. The process took me a few minutes using the old seal and a rubber mallet. A 3d printed ghetto tool would likely not have been of much value here seeing how large this seal is.

    Step 1:
    [​IMG]

    Step 358:
    [​IMG]

    Because I'm an idiot, I tried to clean the black surface of the block visible above, until I realized the block is painted black.

    Tomorrow I'll be doing cam seals and some more steaming and scrubbing. Fun fun fun fun, looking forward to the weekend.
     
  19. pitty

    pitty likes the tuna here

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    Scrubbing? Nobody wants to do that.

    Turns out I have a new water pump, high time to install it. Old vs. new (madeinchina Gates) - both have a cast impeller, and look generally identical save for part number markings.
    [​IMG]

    Under the old water pump is my nemesis, nigh-thirty year old paper gasket. Better clear my schedule for the week.
    [​IMG]

    N days and a cistern of elbow grease later...
    [​IMG]

    Shiny new pump, hope it doesn't fail after three weeks of use! To Gates' credit, they included supplementary gaskets and o-rings for parts that aren't even on the pump.
    [​IMG]

    Cam seals, why not. These don't seem to be leaky, but as I'm already doing every other seal... In the foreground - coolant return and thermostat housing. More on that later.
    [​IMG]

    Cam seals are easily replaced by removing the cam caps over them via a procedure familiar to every butcher dentist as "pulling them hard with pliers". Once removed they expose the seal.
    [​IMG]

    Well that was pretty boring, but turns out I have a coolant reroute kit. Why coolant reroute? The engine is adapted from a front wheel drive motor whence the coolant goes in at the pump and goes out at the back of the engine. In a Miata, the coolant still goes in at the pump and goes out three inches away from the pump through the return pipe visible above. The rear coolant exit is not used which means that there isn't much, if any, coolant flow happening in the back of the engine, and the fourth cylinder tends to overheat compared to the first. Coolant reroute opens up the rear port and returns a semblance of sanity to the system.

    Here I pulled off the blocking plate from the sealed rear port.
    [​IMG]

    ... and cleaned it up a bit with Gunk and Henry J Steamer. Stud got removed as well.
    [​IMG]

    Port is converted to an outlet via magic billet parts. The big pipe sends the coolant forward to the radiator through a long hose, while the small pipe is a heater core port which I have half a mind to just loop.
    [​IMG]

    Thank you FM for using bizarre allen fastener sizes for which I have no proper bits!
    [​IMG]
    (Bonus Mitsubishi parts for those of the cult)

    The return pipe and thermostat housing gets blocked off by a plate with some ports for a radiator thermoswitch and god knows what else.
    [​IMG]

    And that's enough for today, here's some obligatory made-in-Straya go fast parts.
    [​IMG]
     
  20. tperkins

    tperkins Devout AYC Disciple

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    I noticed the Mitsu parts before I noticed your text underneath, and was excited to point it out, then disappointed. Clean more things :)